Our talk with Klyn Elsbury brings us to discuss different techniques of the recruiting process and how to hire better. The full transcript for Talk Experiential episode #20 Understanding How to Hire Better is followed below.

#20 Understanding How to Hire Better

Klyn Elsbury on episode #20 of Talk Experiential.
JOEY:

Hey guys, you made it to episode number 20.  Thanks for joining us.  Thank you for listening for Talk Experiential.  I’m pretty excited on just the growth of where we’re going want to welcome our next guest, Klyn Elsbury, who’s an inspirational founder of Landmark Makers and recruiting firm that not only finds talent but educates companies and founders on how to do it themselves.  She’s also a self-made author and speaker, who travels across the world encouraging people and telling people about her life story, which is pretty incredible, that you’ll learn on this podcast.

You’ll learn about her terminal genetic condition, called Cystic Fibrosis, who was only given life expectancy to 14 years of age.  Her story is pretty incredible and encouraging.  Excited to share this with you guys and hope you guys enjoy.

Welcome back to the Talk Experiential podcast.  Your host Joey Kercher, excited for my guest, Klyn Elsbury, from San Diego.  Hey, thanks for joining.

KLYN:

Yeah, absolutely, this is going to be fun.

JOEY:

Well, I’ve got to tell the story, first, of how we met.  We met in Utah.  We actually hung out during the weekend.  It was kind of a lot going out.  It was two events in one.  I don’t think we really had — We didn’t have a conversation at all, we met each other.

KLYN:

No.

JOEY:

But, it wasn’t until leaving, going to the airport, I all of a sudden see you sitting at the restaurant, just randomly and then we had lunch.

KLYN:

Yeah.

JOEY:

So, it was fun.

KLYN: 

Yeah, that actually was.  There were some really good lobster rolls there.  I kind of want to go back.

JOEY:  

That’s right.  Good old Utah.

KLYN:  

Yeah.

JOEY:     

Well, awesome, why don’t you tell me about your story?  You’re on this podcast for a reason, because one, we’ve obviously built a relationship and you’re just a very fascinating person.  I’d love to hear about you.

KLYN: 

Yeah, thanks.  And I think I’m also on the podcast because I bought lunch that day and said, “Now you have to interview me, ha ha ha.”

JOEY: 

Oh, there you go.  So there was a transaction.

KLYN: 

So, full circle.  Lobster rolls working for us then.  No, so that’s funny.  I have a company; it’s a recruiting company, Landmark Makers, and basically, I’ve built it up from the ground up.  I was on disability because I had way too many frequent infections with cystic fibrosis.  So, I’m hospitalized all the time, bored out of my mind, and I decided to start a recruiting company.  So, we built that from the ground up and then the Entrepreneurs Organization asked me one day, “Hey, do you want to speak at our biggest event of the year?”  I’m like, “Cool, that sounds like fun,” and I was the top rated speaker and there were a couple agents in the room and now I am booked on the National Speaking Circuit and I travel speaking about inspirational and personal development and getting over your excuses, while I’m running my recruiting company.  So, I went from disability to two companies and traveling to Utah to meet new friends.

JOEY:   

Right?  So, you’re bored and you started a recruiting company.  What?  That sounds crazy.

KLYN: 

It is.  So much of our lives are crazy, Joey.  No, the full story.  I did recruiting for like 5-6 years beforehand and then when my lung function got to 38%, I said, “Well, can’t work for anybody else.  Six months off a year for hospitalizations, that doesn’t do anybody any favors,” so, I started writing everything I knew about recruiting and it wound up being like 387 pages.  And I documented an entire process and I was like, “Well, if I build a company that I don’t need to be in, I just need to train people to understand my process and then I don’t have to physically work, in case I get hospitalized, etcetera, and that frees up my time,” and sure enough the strategy worked out pretty well and so we created a recruiting arm where there’s actual physical recruiters doing the recruiting, and then we created an online training company that teaches any hired manager, HR person, entrepreneur, small entrepreneur how to basically do what we do, so that way they don’t need to ever use a recruiter if they don’t want to.

 

JOEY:     

That’s great.  That’s great.  So, you’re almost taking it from finding the recruiting to turning it into an education for them to learn on their own.

 

KLYN:    

Hundred percent, because most companies, they just don’t know what to do, it’s not that they can’t do it, and 20-25% fees for recruiting agencies — I mean, it’s 2018, all their candidates are on LinkedIn.  It’s a lack of education and I built the company with the idea that I was not going to be in it a long term.  We never knew how my health would rebound.  Rebound, I don’t know why I pronounced it like rebound.  And so, sure enough, there was a demand.  I did a lot of marketing techniques, but I also feel like I got pretty lucky and people love it, it’s implementable, you just download stuff.  It’s like recruiting in a box.

 

JOEY: 

Right?  No, that’s great.  And, like you said, there’s so many resources out there and a lot of these companies sometimes can’t afford a recruiting company.  So, how do you find people on your own?  I guess, that’s kind of the biggest thing.  I’d like to talk about your story too, in a minute, but I’d like to kind of get into how you — You just started the company, all of a sudden you’re like, “All right, we’re going to just make a company, cool,” like we all do.  We’re crazy at night and, “I don’t want to work for someone.”  Obviously, you have a different circumstance.  How did you grow it?

 

 

KLYN:

Yeah.  So, essentially, my boyfriend’s in the Entrepreneurs Organization and he’s a beast of a salesman himself.  And it was funny, I was on a yacht party and this was — Seriously, I was in and out of the hospital all the time, wheelchair ridden, etcetera.  And I was on a yacht party and there was a bunch of entrepreneurs in the room, and at the time — I met my boyfriend online so I totally lied about who I was, right?  And, he thought that I was just this cute chick in San Diego and at the time I wasn’t really working.  I never told him about my past in recruiting.  And he owned a call center of sales people.

 

And on this party, there was a bunch of people just talking about hirings and the problems that they have, and out of nowhere, I just start chiming in and giving advice.  I’m like, “You should do this.  You should do that.  This is how you should pivot it.  Well, that’s because you hired the wrong person,” and I would do on the spot interviews with them and make them role play.  And we’re leaving the party and my boyfriend goes, “How do you know all that?”  He wasn’t my boyfriend at the time.  And I was like, “Oh yeah, I used to recruit.”  He’s like, “This is a company,” and so he got fueled up and I was just like, “Well, this might be a sign.”  So, we grew it.  I didn’t even have a website the first year and a half; it was all through word of mouth and then doing the trainings and the seminars and corporate workshops.  And then, obviously, word of mouth still is a big part of my business, but then it just started growing through some other social media channels, has always been my favorite.

 

JOEY:   

Right, right.  No, that’s great.  Now, you’re doing more than recruiting, right now, you’re speaking, you’re an author, I know that there’s this Facebook group as well.  You want to tell me a little bit about that?

 

KLYN: 

Yeah.  So, recruiting is always a love of mine.  The company runs itself, right, because I built it like that.  So, I don’t need to be in it unless you and I decide you want to have a conversation about how to recruit and you want to open up and tell me some of your problems, then I get involved.  I do consultations and workshops and speaking about it.  But, the physical recruiting, except for one or two clients a year, I personally do not do.

 

But then, yeah, I wrote my book in 2016 is when it came out, and that hit bestseller status, so that made me super fortunate and now I do this speaking as well.  And, the predominant time throughout every single week is traveling, speaking, and monitoring the group.  It’s a very fun group on Facebook, anyone is welcome to join, and we just talk about some of the things like Imposter Syndrome and limiting beliefs.  I open it up for feedback.  So if there’s any criticism, people just DM me and they tell me where I’m messing up or what I’m doing wrong, and then they also experiential share, which has done just insane things for some of the members, as far as growing into who they are and being better leaders in their company, better husbands, better wives.  It’s incredible, what’s happening with that.

 

JOEY:       

Right.  Well, just with our group of friends and I’m sure your group of friends, for me, I’m always wanting to be around people that inspire me and make me better and think more positively.  It’s cool, we would talk before this — I don’t do experiential marketing but you do because creating a community, I think, is huge.  You and I had an issue with a certain person that we were able to pinpoint who that person was and rely on other people like, “Get that person out on there.”  I don’t know, just the reliance of a community like this is huge, I think.

 

KLYN:  

Yeah, and for me, 100% of experiential marketing has always been a community.  I could talk to you about how to grow your LinkedIn, I can talk to you about how to prospect candidates, that’s just easy.  It’s just essentially farming for people that are like minded enough, whether that’s to fit a job description or to fit into your community of friendships.  And when somebody threatens that community as a whole, or threatens to disrupt a company culture because they weren’t a right fit, it is the community that comes together and we band together and we say, “Hey, they gots to go.  There’s just no room for you.  There’s just no room for you, Mr. Candidate, interviewing today.”  So, the principles are all the same.

 

JOEY:  

Right, exactly.  So, you’ve done a lot of stuff.  I guess with the speaking — Is the speaking kind of tied with recruiting or is that something separate that you’re focusing on?

 

KLYN: 

So, it’s two distinct brands.  So, the recruiting is Landmark Makers, and the speaking is Miss Klyn Media, both of which do require travel.  So, for example, last week I did have an event that I spoke at.  It was a workshop.  It was just eight people and we did everything from job descriptions to how to pick up the phone and call a candidate, what to say, how to sell them on the company, the career and leadership team, or I’ll do a keynote plus a presentation.  So, I’ve done a few in Vegas in year, I think one in Boston.  Yeah, it was Boston.

 

And then, for the speaking side, that’s Miss Klyn Media.  So, that’s the story of overcoming adversity and to live by the principles, technically three principles, to hit the fourth one and it’s called, “Life all in,” and that’s Vision. Habits. Love.  So, it really depends on the organization and what they need, but recruiting is just like my first love and so the speaking, the inspirational speaking side is just something that went viral so many times that I was an idiot if I didn’t start following the trend.

 

JOEY:    

Yeah.  Well, you know, I think — I know I want to talk about marketing but — No, I love — If you don’t mind telling your story, I think it just tells a lot.  You can get a lot more value out of just your story than us just trying to talk about marketing.  But, yeah, I’d love to hear more about it.

 

KLYN:      

Yeah, so I was born and — By all means, if I start to ramble, just truncate it and ask a different question.  But, when I was born, it was with a life threatening genetic condition, known as Cystic Fibrosis.  And for those of the listeners who aren’t familiar what that is, basically right now I believe the median life expectancy is 21, and that’s because it fills our lungs with thick, sticky mucus, that we can’t cough out and it essentially destroys our pancreas.

 

So, at 30 — I do have one of the most common mutations.  I’m pretty open about my health struggles on my blog.  But, at 30, I am one of the healthiest and fittest people in the world with this condition and I think that’s partly why the reason why I am able to travel and speak and inspire and do what I do.

 

And, I think it was last year, I still spent over 100 days on IV antibiotics.  This year I’ve been very fortunate, I don’t know what’s going on, it’s an anomaly, but this year I’ve only been on IVs for about three weeks, when two of that was actually physically in a hospital.  So, I’ve kind of gotten a lucky streak.  I don’t necessarily have 100% definitive answer as to why I’m luckier than most patients, but it’s a disease that most people don’t know about that just completely destroys lives, from the inside out.

 

JOEY:    

Right.  Well, and talking through this, when you told me in Utah, I’m like, “Oh, my gosh.”  I had tears coming down.

 

KLYN:  

Aw, Joey.

JOEY:      

I don’t know.  It’s pretty cool, your attitude with it.  I think a lot of people would be like, “All right, screw this.  I’m done.  I’m going to be a pity part and feel bad for myself,” but you’ve — You’re in the hospital a lot, you are able to pull yourself out and find positive around it.  I just think it’s fascinating.  I don’t know how you do it.

 

KLYN: 

I work every day in the hospital.  I put a note on my door saying, “Conference calls between this and this hour.”  The doctors, at this point — I mean, they know me, I’m a regular, right?  So, it’s like going to your favorite restaurant.  The waitress knows when you’re on your phone, don’t bother then.  Just fill up your Coke, flash my ID, you know?  Get what you need to get and scat, I’ve got stuff to do.  And the hospitals, it’s kind of weird.  I don’t know what it is, but they tend to be my most productive weeks because you’ve got that fire in your belly about why you’re alive and it’s great because people reach out and that’s when you can connect with old friends.  But, you know, after you’ve been there for a couple of days and you’re starting to respond to the medications, it’s like, “Cool, now what do I do?”  and for me, the answer has never been sit there and let the disease take its course, it’s always been, “If I don’t leave this hospitalization through the entrance, I leave through the morgue,” what did I want my final days to be spent doing?

 

JOEY:  

Right.

KLYN:  

That wasn’t — That fuels me to grow my company, actually.

 

JOEY:   

Right, and because you’ve known this since a young age, right?

 

KLYN:   

Oh, yeah.  That’s it.

 

JOEY:

Because you were born with this, and even at a young age, did you have this same attitude with it or is something that changed?

 

KLYN:   

I think it was worse as a young age.  I was always super motivated, super inclined, I think because as I get older I’m lazier.

 

JOEY:                         [0:14:42.7]

 

KLYN:    

Oh my gosh, I think I’m just — Because now the IVs, they’re kicking my butt a little bit more than they were when I was younger.  When I was younger, I used to be able to run a few miles on it.  Now, I’m like, “If I get 3,000 steps, you all better congratulate me and tell me I’m the best person on the planet.”  That’s a miracle.

 

But, I think a lot of it, growing up my parents never let me have excuses, ever.  And, kind of, I wished they would.  But, it didn’t matter.  There was a gym class and everybody had to run a mile and I wanted to call home and say, “They’re running a mile.  Please, don’t make me run, Mom and Dad.”  And my mom was like, “You don’t have to run it, but if you die soon, that’s your fault.”  And I was like, “Oh, I guess I’m running the mile at gym class,” and so I never really got the luxury of allowing myself to be sick, if that makes sense.

 

JOEY:  

Right.  It sounds like through a young age, you weren’t sick a whole lot.

 

KLYN:    

Like twice a year I was hospitalized, so in CF world, that’s not very sick.

 

JOEY: 

Yeah.  But, it’s an incredible story, knowing that any day something could happen.  It’s a good way of thinking, too.  Even with your condition — And I don’t have a condition like that, I could die tomorrow or today, I don’t know.  But, being able to realize that life is very short, I just think it’s fascinating and great.

 

KLYN: 

Yeah, and it’s a homing technique, too.  There’s this — I don’t remember how it came up, biblical times, whatever.  But, there’s a bunch of guys in a bar, saloon, whatever they were called back then, marketplace, and they’re all having drinks.  And the one guy goes, “If you die today, what happens?”  And he looks at all of his famous philosophical friends, “What would you do differently?”  And the guy was like, “Oh, I’d go date the saloon woman,” or something like that, and then the other guy is like, “I’d go shopping with all the money I made at the market and I’d blow everything,” and the other one is like, “I would travel out of this town.”  They all had these really amazing things of what they would do if they died.

 

And one guy just stands up and he goes, “I would continue doing exactly what I’m doing now.”  And when I heard that story, even though I don’t remember the details of it, if anybody knows what reference I’m talking to, share it, but when I heard that I was like, “What are you doing right now, and if this is your last moment, are you going to be happy with that?  Or is there going to be that pit in your stomach where you’re like, ‘Nah, I wish I did something else.’”  It’s powerful.  That brings you home.

 

JOEY:     

Right.  Well, and then there’s a lot of people that are in a position where they think that’s it and being able to make a quick change — For instance, I was in an Uber, just riding home from the airport the other day.  Nice guy, very talkative, and he’s been doing Uber for two years, and just kept talking.  He was like, “Man, I really want to get back in the work force and fix up my resume and do LinkedIn,” and I’m like, “Okay, so what are your plans of doing it?” and he was kind of blown away from that question.  He’s like, “What?  Oh, no one’s really asked me that before like, ‘How are you going to do that?’”  Just talking about it is not going to help.  You’ve got to make an action and that’s hard for a lot of people.  They feel like they’re stuck in different places and, yeah, it’s interesting.

 

KLYN:   

I have a girlfriend who hates her job and she’s [0:18:38.9], it sucks.  But, if I count, I don’t even know at this point, how many times she’s said that she wanted to quit and find something else.  But, now when she says it, I’m like, [0:18:47.6] “She’s never going to quit.”  We have now and if we’re not — And that’s why I created the tutorials that we were talking about: the Vision. Habits. Love, is because is because it’s how do you create the habits around your vision, in your ultimate life?  And are those habits keeping you accountable?  And it breaks my heart to see such an amazing woman never be able to quit her job because she doesn’t know what to do but yet it suffocates her.

 

And I think, my disease is called Cystic Fibrosis but everybody’s got something and I’d rather have CF than be stuck in a dead end job that I absolutely hate, that crushes my soul.

 

JOEY: 

Right, exactly.  And you’re happy with that, too.  You now know that you’re doing exactly what you want to be doing, from what I understand.

 

KLYN: 

Yeah, I’m totally jazzed.  There are days where I look at the clock and I’m like, “Crap, it’s 6 o’clock.”  I work from home, if you can’t tell, but some of the problem with that is my boyfriend doesn’t.  So, he’ll come home and he’ll be like, “Did you even shower today?”  And I’m like, “No, that makes four days in a row.”  I don’t notice these things because I wake up and make my coffee and I’m going right to my office, and before I know it, it’s six o’clock and I’m like, “Some days I have to actually shower.  Holy crap.”

 

If I have a client meeting, face-to-face, I’m like, “Wow, today is a really exciting day.  I’m going to shower before 10 pm.”  I’m on fire and I think everybody should have that fire.  I hope they do.

 

JOEY: 

Right.  That’s the goal and that sounds like that’s why you’re doing a lot of these speaking and this Facebook group.  Because it goes deeper than just running your company, right?

 

KLYN:  

So deep.

 

JOEY:  

It goes on a personal level of how to engage with just your life.  From working out, “I need to get back on the gym or run because I know that my health is the only thing I really have,” continuing to move forward, but happiness is another thing.

 

KLYN: 

Yeah, and so many people, they miss it until it’s too late, and then they have that regret and a life of no regrets is the greatest gift you can give yourself .

 

JOEY: 

Right.

 

KLYN:  

I could be wrong on that.  We’ll find out but I’m pretty stoked.

 

JOEY: 

That’s awesome.  What else about you we can talk about?  There’s so many different ways we could go with this.  We have a few more minutes left we can chat.

 

KLYN: 

You think about your listeners and tell me what they want to hear and I can adjust accordingly.

 

JOEY:  

Well, why don’t we quickly just touch on just some different — You are an entrepreneur, there is some marketing with it.  I know we kind of touched on a referral system, why don’t you tell me a little bit about that?

 

KLYN:  

Let’s talk about how to market candidates, if you’re hiring.

 

JOEY: 

Yeah, let’s do that.

 

KLYN:     

Yeah, I got you.  And tell me a little bit.  Are you personally hiring?

 

JOEY: 

We are personally hiring, internally.  We’re obviously a talent agency, staffing agency, but also internal, as well.

 

KLYN:     

Are you comfortable talking about what you’re hiring for?  Because we can do some experiential shares on it.

 

JOEY:

Why don’t we do that?  That’d be great.

 

KLYN: 

Yeah.

 

JOEY:   

So, right now, I have two positions.  Looking for sales, like an account executive position, and then also, as we grow, looking for a producer account manager position, as well.

 

KLYN: 

Okay.  So which ones do you typically have the most difficulty with?  Which ones does your employee typically have the most difficulty in recruiting for?

 

JOEY:  

You know what’s funny?  We staff hundreds and thousands of people a year, on a contract basis, and we’ve gotten really good at it.  It’s really a psychology of trying to find that right person that will accept the job, show up on time, and then we pay them, and then repeat.  But, internally, we’ve had — It’s been just an open door, going through the line of people.

 

KLYN: 

All for the AEs?

 

JOEY:   

Mostly account coordinators, helping out with staffing.  I’ve had a couple account executives.  That might be the toughest one.  I’ve realized that I’m the best sales person but on a scalability level, I can’t be talking to everyone, so how do I build an olive branch and just continue to grow with just being in touch?  Because I’m realizing, even just an email just saying, “Hey, we’re around,” every quarter, is huge.

 

KLYN: 

And it’s interesting you say that.  So, most CEOs hit that thing where the company is successful because they are the best salesperson.  So, giving up that need for control or seeing their name as number one, whether that’s ego or fear of revenues, that’s a huge thing.  When you’re recruiting your AEs — We’ve recruited AEs.  Any sales position is usually my forte.  I freaking love recruiting them.  When I first started my company, back before it was official with my boyfriend, I tried to start a recruiting company where I went out and I found recruiters to recruit for recruiting agencies, so the ultimate ice and Eskimo situation.

 

What I’ve found is I never approached them as if — I approached everybody as if they did not want a position and my baby is — It’s always going to be LinkedIn.  So, I can give you guys some cool LinkedIn tools, some cool ways to leverage LinkedIn, so that way when you reach out to an AE, you can essentially sell the company, the career and the leadership team, because as you know, most positions right now, especially in sales, the average tenure is 18 to 24 months.  So, knowing that you’ve got to replace that, if your turnover is already a little trickier there, you still have to replace them every 18 to 24 months, which means in order to have a proactive pipeline — I say it like that because that’s the name of my course.  In order to have a proactive pipeline, we always estimate you should be interviewing three times the amount of people for positions you need in the upcoming year, as predicted.

 

JOEY: 

Got it.  So, always have that door open and always be interviewing, even if we think we found that person?

 

KLYN:  

Yeah, because you want to have a virtual bench, you know?  And so then you’re shopping when you’re hungry, as opposed to shopping when you’re full.  And when you’re shopping when you’re hungry, a couple of things are going to happen, you’re going to wind up picking out candidates that don’t [0:25:34.5] all of your core values, all of your core situations, and you’re going to be in a rush to make a hire and it’s essentially going to do the same thing that you’re in, it just might postpone the inevitable for another six months.

And we don’t even want to get into the cost of high turnover on employee morale, what it does to the systems, what it does to the training, what it does to operations, what it does to you, because if you’re the biggest salesperson, and you’re having difficulties finding your AE, I don’t know what you make an hour but I have a feeling what you make an hour is way more than what this account executive is going to be making per hour, and so for you to jump back and retrain somebody, every 12 months or less, it’s just spinning all of the wheels.

 

JOEY: 

Right.  No, that’s good advice.  How do you keep someone longer term than 18 to 24 months, or is that an unrealistic thought?

 

KLYN:   

It’s not unrealistic and it’s one of the topics on recruiting that I’m most passionate about.  So, what you’re essentially asking me is, “How do I build an organization with a company culture that allows people to not quit for the four main reasons people quit?”  And, you’re like, “Well, what are these four reasons?”  Well, I’m glad you asked.  So, pretty much, people quit because of emotional intelligence, lack of opportunity to involve in extracurricular things, like passion, volunteer work.  The other two reasons include just general lack of skill set and then lack of coachability or temperament issues.

 

Okay, so you think about those three.  Now, some of those you can’t change.  Inherently, every organization is going to have one of those things.  Maybe coachability, maybe you just don’t have the time to train your employees.  Cool, know your employees are going to quit all the time for coaching issues.  But, here’s where it gets interesting.  Millennials — All right, so I’m a millennial so I can make these comments.  A millennial typically wants something called passion and a paycheck or significance and success, and they tend to quit the quickest because they don’t see immediate results.

So, for most organizations, they’re set up the way that our parents set things up or their bureaucracy or they’re so large that change doesn’t happen at the level that they need change.  And for our generation, what we tend to want is short term gratification and words of affirmation or nice gestures, coupled with the belief that the long term is possible.  We don’t want to quit companies.  We really don’t.  It hurts us just as much as it hurts you.  We just want to quit things where we don’t see the value we’re producing, and so when you ask, “How do I keep an employee over that 18 to 24 months,” these tactics work for everybody but they can specifically work for millenials.

 

So, in order to keep something, I want you on their first day, during the interview process, ask them what kind of books they like to read.  On the first day, I want you to have a fat book or one of the newest bestsellers of that author or that genre on their desk, with the words like, “We look forward to joining the team with you.”  Bonus points if it’s a sales book or a personal development growth book because now you’re giving their tools and you’re tying your subconscious into those warm feelings.

 

After every small milestone, I want you to have a mini company event.  I want you to personally recognize them.  Get yourself on video, “Hey Adam, great job talking to your first client.  I’m pretty sure you’re going to go long in this company, but my door is always open if you need help,” and send them that video when they have that first sale or something like that.

 

So, these little recognization programs, all they feed into is the short-term gratification.  And then every six months, once a quarter if you guys can afford it, do something giving back to the community where you give the millennial a choice on, “Do you want to get paid an extra three hours of work or can we give you a paid time to go help out at this food bank or to do something for the communities?” and take photos.  Have a company hashtag, upload it to Instagram, and then once every six months, select one of the best photos and that employee gets a perk, whether that’s whatever was on deals of the day at Amazon, something techy, whether that’s a personal development course, if they mentioned earlier they were into that, whatever their [0:29:43.5] is, have a customized plan for their long term.  And let them vote, let them have a say.

 

JOEY:  

I just got a ton of value out of this.  This is awesome!

 

KLYN:

Oh, thank you.  I was so worried that my marketing and recruiting advice, you wouldn’t find value in.

 

JOEY:    

No, no, see I think you misinterpret what marketing is, because marketing is so broad range and obviously this podcast is Talk Experiential but there’s so much more than — You know, it is experiential because it’s psychology, really.  Just dealing with a millennial, dealing with you — Getting you on a podcast was pulling teeth.  No, just kidding.

 

KLYN: 

Oh, shut your face, it was perfect.  The easiest guest you’ve ever had.

 

JOEY: 

I’m kidding.  No, I think these are so important.  The things that you don’t think about to make people — And I think the biggest thing, people want to feel like they’re part of something.

 

KLYN: 

Hundred percent.

 

JOEY: 

That’s what we’ve seen when we do a lot of these staffing events.  Typically, we do these tours, but we like — Instead of just hiring a bunch of random people, we like to hire a group.  And they feel like they’re part of the group and the brand likes it, they like it, and let them actually — They have brains, let them deal with things.  Everyone’s an entrepreneur in their own way.

 

KLYN: 

Yeah.  Hundred percent agree.  And we just — We want those warm fuzzies that we’re not getting.  We spend so much of our time connected to our phone but not each other, so if we are in a workplace where we feel like we can finally connect with other people, give us that feeling, because there’s a study that came out.  We’re the loneliest generation.  And, I don’t want to get all too warm and fuzzy, but I totally agree.

 

I have, I don’t know, last I looked, 45,000 social media followers.  So, not a lot, but you’d think that all the time I’m busy and I never have feelings of loneliness but, you know, sometimes I’m surrounded at a bunch of people at a party and I’m more alone than I ever have been, and it’s because I sometimes forget what it’s like to truly reach out and communicate and I tend to be really good at that, that’s why I have my book and a speaking tour.  But, you know, the average person or the average employee, they don’t have the emotional intelligence or the emotional skills to recognize loneliness, they just see it as sadness or anger or hopelessness.  And if you’re in an organization where your employees feel those ways, you’re going to have higher turnover.

 

JOEY:      

Right.  Right.  I mean, you nailed it, too.  I think, just technology can be positive and negative in everybody’s lives, and depending on how you use it — You’re at home, running a company, you don’t have to be anywhere and then building relationships online — Facebook and social media, I’m not a huge fan but we do need it, as entrepreneurs.

 

KLYN:    

Hundred percent, yeah.

 

JOEY:  

And, it kills me sometimes too, it’s just like — You give so much but then you’re a lurker, but you need the feedback.  I don’t know.  The way we’re living these days and the future, it’s going to be very interesting on how people are connected.  And this is why I started — Not why I started but why I get more excited about what we do.  Go experience something, even just travelling or doing these trips.  Be with a human.  We worked with the founders of [0:33:29.7] and we take phones away at these dinners or events.  You don’t need your phone, you’re looking in your pocket like, “Where’s my phone?  Oh I don’t have it.”  I can talk to you, like a human.

 

KLYN:  

Yeah, and what’s interesting is if I don’t have my phone, I have anxiety like, “Where’s it at?”  And you hear that, “Ding,” and I’m like, “Okay, what’s going on?  What’d I miss?” and just to distract from your phone is just an important skill.  I love social media probably more than anybody.  I’m on it 15 hours a day.  That’s how I build everything is through organic social media reach and I don’t know what I’d do without it.  So, that’s like some of the events we go to, like we didn’t have service for a couple days in Utah, at least where my room was, and I was about ready to jump off the mountain.  It was infuriating.

 

JOEY:  

It is.  It’s like you don’t know what to do with your life.

 

KLYN: 

If there was an awkward silence, you know how easy it is just to act like we’re checking the time?  You know, elevator rides?  So much more pleasant when we can just scroll, as opposed to asking people how their day is.  You know what I mean?  So, it’s like this is the world we live in and you can be good at social media or you can be good at building relationships utilizing social media, and I think that’s the difference that a lot of people haven’t quite figured out yet.

 

JOEY:   

Right.  Oh, exactly.  Well, Klyn, it’s been great having you.  I know we’re kind of running out of time but I’d love to have you on another one soon.

 

KLYN: 

Yes.

 

JOEY: 

Literally, you’ve given me a ton of great stuff, hopefully, our listeners as well.  So, thanks for joining and I’ll put some of your links on our podcast, as well.

 

KLYN:  

Great and of course if they want a free book, it’s just a like a 30 page e-book on recruiting, I’ll give you that link.  And then, if they want the Vision. Habits. Love free tutorial to get back in touch with who you are, we can hook that up, too.

 

JOEY: 

Perfect.  Sounds good.  Well, thanks a lot, have a great day.

 

KLYN:     

Bye.

 

JOEY:      

Bye.

 

Find the list of full Talk Experiential episodes here.

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